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Suspected testicular torsion: a survey of clinical practice in North West England.

Authors
  • Pearce, I
  • Islam, S
  • McIntyre, I G
  • O'Flynn, K J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Publication Date
May 01, 2002
Volume
95
Issue
5
Pages
247–249
Identifiers
PMID: 11983766
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Several aspects of the management of suspected testicular torsion are controversial. A questionnaire was mailed to all 33 consultant urologists in the North West region of England to elicit their policies for routine clinical management. 29 of 33 questionnaires were returned (2 incomplete). As regards radiological investigation, 4 consultants always request ultrasound examination; the others do not favour routine imaging. When the diagnosis of testicular torsion is confirmed at operation, all consultants would perform bilateral testicular fixation, although with considerable variations in technique; most use Vicryl sutures (66%) and three-point fixation (57%). One-third would do an ipsilateral orchidopexy if there was no clear evidence of testicular torsion at operation. The variation revealed by this survey prompted an attempt to formulate a protocol for management. A review of the published work indicates that, in cases of proven testicular torsion, treatment should include bilateral fixation with delayed-absorption or non-absorbable sutures; fixation should be at three points. When torsion is not found at operation, there is no evidence of benefit from orchidopexy.

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