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Survivin and escaping in therapy-induced cellular senescence.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Cancer
0020-7136
Publisher
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Volume
128
Issue
7
Pages
1546–1558
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/ijc.25482
PMID: 20503268
Source
Medline

Abstract

Therapy-induced accelerated cellular senescence (ACS) is a reversible tumor response to chemotherapy that is likely detrimental to the overall therapeutic efficacy of cancer treatment. To further understand the mechanism by which cancer cells can escape the sustained cell cycle arrest in ACS, we established a tissue culture model, in which the p53-null NCI-H1299 cells can be induced into senescence by an abbreviated exposure to a chemotherapeutic agent. Previously, we have reported that senescent cells overexpress Cdc2/Cdk1 when they bypassed the prolonged arrest and their viability is dependent on Cdc2/Cdk1 kinase activity. In our study, we show that human survivin is the immediate downstream effector of the Cdc2/Cdk1 mediated survival signal. Survivin cooperates with Cdc2/Cdk1 to inhibit apoptosis following chemotherapy and promote senescence escape. Using HIV-1 TAT peptides to disrupt survivin phosphorylation by Cdc2/Cdk1, we also found that phosphorylated survivin is necessary both for the escape of senescent cells and for maintenance of subsequent viability after bypassing senescence. These results further propose survivin as an important determinant of senescence reversibility and as a putative molecular target to enforce cell death in ACS.

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