Affordable Access

Surgical approach to malignant melanoma in the gastrointestinal tract.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of surgical oncology
Publication Date
Volume
36
Issue
1
Pages
17–20
Identifiers
PMID: 3626557
Source
Medline

Abstract

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a common site for malignant melanoma. Diagnosis of lesions in the GI tract is usually delayed until complications occur, such as obstruction, bleeding, or perforation of the GI tract. Of 348 patients with malignant melanoma treated during a 10-year period, 11 had GI involvement either in a metastatic form or as a primary melanoma. Three of these patients were treated surgically for metastatic lesions in the small bowel causing intussusception, two for peritonitis secondary to perforation of the small bowel, and one for massive bleeding from metastatic melanoma in the stomach. Another patient had a primary melanoma in the esophagus and underwent esophagectomy. Three patients had primary melanomas of the anal canal and one of the rectum. Three of them underwent abdominoperineal resections, and two had bilateral groin dissection in addition. Six of the patients are alive 6 months to 4 years following diagnosis. The remaining five died of metastatic melanoma from 6 months to 4 years post-surgery.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments