Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Surface area accounts for the relation of gray matter volume to reading-related skills and history of dyslexia.

Authors
  • Frye, Richard E
  • Liederman, Jacqueline
  • Malmberg, Benjamin
  • McLean, John
  • Strickland, David
  • Beauchamp, Michael S
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cerebral Cortex
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2010
Volume
20
Issue
11
Pages
2625–2635
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhq010
PMID: 20154011
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

It is unknown whether the abnormalities in brain structure and function observed in dyslexic readers are congenital or arise later in development. Analyzing the 2 components of gray matter volume separately may help in differentiating these possibilities. Gray matter volume is the product of cortical surface area, determined during prenatal brain development, and cortical thickness, determined during postnatal development. For this study, 16 adults with a history of phonological dyslexia and 16 age- and gender-matched controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging and an extensive battery of tests of reading-related skills. Cortical surface area and gray matter volume measures of the whole brain, the inferior frontal gyrus, and the fusiform gyrus were similarly related to phonological skills and a history of dyslexia. There was no relationship between cortical thickness and phonological skills or history of dyslexia. Because cortical surface area reflects cortical folding patterns determined prenatally, this suggests that brain differences in dyslexia are rooted in early cortical development and are not due to compensatory changes that occur during postnatal development and would be expected to influence cortical thickness. This study demonstrates the importance of examining the separate components of gray matter volume when studying developmental abnormalities.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times