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Suprachoroidal Hemorrhage Simulating Melanoma in Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

Authors
  • Honig, Stephanie E.
  • Srinivasan, Archana
  • Shields, Carol L.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ocular Oncology and Pathology
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Publication Date
Oct 11, 2018
Volume
5
Issue
3
Pages
162–166
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1159/000490390
Source
Karger
Keywords
License
Green
External links

Abstract

<bold><italic>Background:</italic></bold> We report a case of suprachoroidal hemorrhage simulating choroidal melanoma in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). <bold><italic>Methods:</italic></bold> Case report. <bold><italic>Results:</italic></bold> A 79-year-old white male with a history of lung adenocarcinoma, ITP, and mild anemia noted blurred vision with photopsia and floaters in the right eye (OD) that worsened over 2 months. He was found to have a pigmented choroidal mass and was referred for evaluation of possible choroidal melanoma. Visual acuity was 20/30 in the affected right eye and 20/25 in the left eye (OS). There was mild vitreous hemorrhage and 2 pigmented peripheral choroidal tumors in the temporal and nasal fundus OD. B-scan ultrasonography confirmed 2 acoustically hollow tumors, and transillumination demonstrated no shadowing. Optical coherence tomography over the lesions revealed choroidal elevation with suprachoroidal scalloped surface. Fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography revealed normal choroidal fluorescence and cyanescence with no “double circulation” of melanoma and no dye blockage, suggesting a suprachoroidal location. These findings were suggestive of suprachoroidal hemorrhage rather than melanoma. The patient was managed conservatively, and the hemorrhages demonstrated spontaneous resolution. <bold><italic>Conclusion:</italic></bold> Ocular manifestations of ITP are uncommon. Rarely, spontaneous suprachoroidal hemorrhage simulating melanoma can occur. A thorough clinical evaluation with multimodal imaging is critical to establishing the appropriate diagnosis.

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