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Suppressive effects of a novel CC chemokine receptor 4 antagonist on Th2 cell trafficking in ligand- and antigen-induced mouse models.

Authors
  • Komiya, Takaki1
  • Sugiyama, Tetsuya
  • Takeda, Kazuhiko
  • Watanabe, Noriki
  • Imai, Masamichi
  • Kokubo, Masaya
  • Tokuda, Natsuko
  • Ochiai, Hiroshi
  • Habashita, Hiromu
  • Shibayama, Shiro
  • 1 Exploratory Research Laboratories, Ono Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 17-2, Wadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-4247, Japan. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
European journal of pharmacology
Publication Date
Nov 15, 2013
Volume
720
Issue
1-3
Pages
335–343
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2013.10.006
PMID: 24140571
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) has been implicated as a preferential marker for T helper type 2 (Th2) cells, and is believed to be involved in the pathology of allergic diseases by controlling Th2 cell trafficking into inflamed tissues. The objective of the study was to characterize the pharmacological properties of E0001-163, a novel CCR4 antagonist. E0001-163 was tested in both in vitro chemotaxis assays as well as in vivo mouse models of CCR4 ligand-induced air pouch and antigen-induced airway inflammation by utilizing in vitro-polarized Th2 cells. In vitro, E0001-163 inhibited migratory response of human Th2-polarized cells to CCL22, a CCR4 ligand, with an IC50 value of 11.9 nM. E0001-163 significantly suppressed CCL22-induced Th2 cell trafficking into mouse air pouch in a dose-dependent manner at doses of 3 and 10mg/kg, suggesting that E0001-163 has an inhibitory effect on CCR4-mediated T cell trafficking in vivo. In addition, E0001-163 partially decreased Th2 cell trafficking and the level of IL-4 in the lungs in Th2-tansferred and ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. T cell trafficking involves multiple chemokine receptors both in acute and chronic phases, and our findings suggest that CCR4, together with other chemokine receptors, may be involved in Th2 cell trafficking under disease conditions.

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