Affordable Access

Superior sagittal sinus and cerebral cortical venous thrombosis caused by congenital protein C deficiency--case report.

Authors
  • Kuwahara, S
  • Abe, T
  • Uga, S
  • Mori, K
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neurologia medico-chirurgica
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2000
Volume
40
Issue
12
Pages
645–649
Identifiers
PMID: 11153197
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

A 47-year-old male receiving anticoagulant therapy for thrombophlebitis in the left leg for several years presented with mild left hemiparesis and ipsilateral hypesthesia. The cause of the thrombophlebitis was still unknown. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed subacute thrombosis of both the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and a cortical vein in the right cerebral hemisphere. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery axial MR imaging demonstrated these lesions more obviously than conventional T2-weighted axial MR imaging. Right carotid angiography showed a partial SSS filling defect and occlusion of the cortical vein with collateral circulation. Coagulation studies revealed decreases in both protein C activity and antigen levels with normal levels of blood coagulation factors II, VII, IX, and X and protein S activity and antigen. The patient's mother had normal levels of both protein C activity and antigen, but his father had decreased levels. The diagnosis was SSS and cerebral cortical venous thrombosis caused by congenital protein C deficiency. The patient was treated conservatively, and his clinical course was uneventful. His neurological dysfunctions recovered within approximately 3 weeks after the onset. Ten months later, right carotid angiography showed recanalization of the SSS and partial filling of the cortical vein. Anticoagulant therapy has been continued, and no cerebral venous thrombosis has recurred during the 1.5 years after the onset.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times