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Suicide Assessment and Management Team-Based Learning Module

Authors
  • Lerchenfeldt, Sarah1
  • Kamel-ElSayed, Suzan2
  • Patino, Gustavo3
  • Thomas, David M.4
  • Wagner, Jolyn5
  • 1 Assistant Professor, Department of Foundational Medical Studies, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
  • 2 Associate Professor, Department of Foundational Medical Studies, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
  • 3 Assistant Professor, Department of Foundational Medical Studies, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine; Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
  • 4 Interim Associate Dean for Preclinical Medical Education, Office of Medical Education, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
  • 5 Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
Type
Published Article
Journal
MedEdPORTAL : the Journal of Teaching and Learning Resources
Publisher
Association of American Medical Colleges
Publication Date
Aug 20, 2020
Volume
16
Identifiers
DOI: 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10952
PMID: 32875096
PMCID: PMC7449577
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Introduction Suicide is a global health problem that health care providers must feel comfortable addressing. Unfortunately, many health care providers are not equipped to assess and treat patients at risk for suicide due to lack of training and education. Interactive resources are needed to educate health professions students about the management of suicidal patients. Methods The suicide assessment and management team-based learning (TBL) module was developed to address the gap in suicide education. After completing the module, students were able to identify key elements for a comprehensive assessment of a patient's risk for suicide and to discuss clinical management for a suicidal patient. The activity was designed for second-year medical students during a psychopathology course, the last organ-system course prior to clerkships. This module could also be used or modified to meet the educational requirements for other health professions, including medical residents, nurse practitioner students, and physician assistant students. Results A total of 342 students among 62 teams participated in the TBL over a period of 3 consecutive years. The class averages for the individual Readiness Assurance Test ranged from 80% to 88%. The class averages for the team Readiness Assurance Test and application questions were comparable across all 3 years. Course evaluations showed the TBL helped students think critically and integrate information to prepare them for their future careers. Discussion Overall, this TBL was an effective educational tool that stimulated high-quality discussion, in which students remained engaged and asked thought-provoking questions.

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