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Succession and toxicity of Microcystis and Anabaena (Dolichospermum) blooms are controlled by nutrient-dependent allelopathic interactions.

Authors
  • Chia, Mathias A1
  • Jankowiak, Jennifer G2
  • Kramer, Benjamin J2
  • Goleski, Jennifer A2
  • Huang, I-Shuo3
  • Zimba, Paul V3
  • do Carmo Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria4
  • Gobler, Christopher J5
  • 1 Department of Biological Sciences, Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Pádua Dias, 11, São Dimas, Postal code: 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil; School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Southampton, NY, 11968, United States. , (Brazil)
  • 2 School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Southampton, NY, 11968, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 Center for Coastal Studies (CCS), Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi, TX 78412 United States. , (United States)
  • 4 Department of Biological Sciences, Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Pádua Dias, 11, São Dimas, Postal code: 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 5 School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Southampton, NY, 11968, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Harmful algae
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2018
Volume
74
Pages
67–77
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.hal.2018.03.002
PMID: 29724344
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Microcystis and Anabaena (Dolichospermum) are among the most toxic cyanobacterial genera and often succeed each other during harmful algal blooms. The role allelopathy plays in the succession of these genera is not fully understood. The allelopathic interactions of six strains of Microcystis and Anabaena under different nutrient conditions in co-culture and in culture-filtrate experiments were investigated. Microcystis strains significantly reduced the growth of Anabaena strains in mixed cultures with direct cell-to-cell contact and high nutrient levels. Cell-free filtrate from Microcystis cultures proved equally potent in suppressing the growth of nutrient replete Anabaena cultures while also significantly reducing anatoxin-a production. Allelopathic interactions between Microcystis and Anabaena were, however, partly dependent on ambient nutrient levels. Anabaena dominated under low N conditions and Microcystis dominated under nutrient replete and low P during which allelochemicals caused the complete suppression of nitrogen fixation by Anabaena and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity. The microcystin content of Microcystis was lowered with decreasing N and the presence of Anabaena decreased it further under low P and high nutrient conditions. Collectively, these results indicate that strong allelopathic interactions between Microcystis and Anabaena are closely intertwined with the availability of nutrients and that allelopathy may contribute to the succession, nitrogen availability, and toxicity of cyanobacterial blooms. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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