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[Successful treatment with anti-epileptic-drug of an 83-year-old man with musical hallucinosis].

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyū no shinpo
Publication Date
Volume
66
Issue
5
Pages
599–603
Identifiers
PMID: 24807375
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

An 83-year-old man with 3 years symptomatic hearing loss suddenly experienced musical hallucinosis. He heard children's songs, folk songs, military songs, and the Japanese national anthem for seven months every day. He sometime had paroxysmal nausea, dull headaches and depressive mood. On examination he had no psychosis or neurological symptoms except sensorineural hearing loss in both ears. MRI brain imaging and electroencephalography showed no significant abnormalities, however <sup>123</sup>I-IMP brain SPECT showed decreased activity in the right temporal lobe and increased activity in the left temporal and parietal lobes. Late phase <sup>123</sup>I-iomazenil brain SPECT showed decreased accumulation in the right temporal lobe compared to the early phase. This indicates right temporal lobe epilepsy. He was diagnosed with epilepsy because of paroxysmal nausea and headache and the laterality of <sup>123</sup>I-IMP brain SPECT and <sup>123</sup>I-iomazenil brain SPECT. The musical hallucinosis was much reduced by carbamazepine 200mg per day. Nine months after beginning carbamazepine we detected decreased activity in the right temporal lobe and increased activity in left temporal and parietal lobes was improved. We do not believe he had epileptogenic musical hallucinosis because his musical hallusinosis was neither paroxysmal nor lateral. We diagnosed auditory Charles Bonnet syndrome with onset 3 years after sensorineural hearing loss due to reversible epileptic like discharge in temporal and parietal lobes. There is no established treatment for musical hallucinosis, but anti-epileptic drugs may be of some help.

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