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Subclinical thyroid dysfunction, bone mineral density, and osteoporosis in a middle-aged Korean population.

Authors
  • Lee, K1
  • Lim, S1
  • Park, H1
  • Woo, H Y1
  • Chang, Y2
  • Sung, E2
  • Jung, H S2
  • Yun, K E2
  • Kim, C W2
  • Ryu, S2
  • Kwon, M J3, 4
  • 1 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. [email protected] , (North Korea)
  • 4 Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. [email protected] , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Osteoporosis International
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Nov 13, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00198-019-05205-1
PMID: 31720711
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Thyroid dysfunction is associated with the loss of bone density (osteoporosis). However, the connection between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and osteoporosis remains controversial. This study found no apparent association between subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical hyperthyroidism and bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femur. The present study examined the relationship between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and BMD in healthy middle-aged adults. A total of 25,510 healthy Koreans with normal free thyroxine levels were enrolled from January 2011 to December 2016, and 91% of subjects visited only once. The average age of the 15,761 women was 45, and the average age of the 9749 men was 48. Levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and BMD were recorded in all subjects. BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. No apparent association was found between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and BMD in the lumbar spine, femur-neck, and proximal femur sites compared with a euthyroid group. Age, body mass index (BMI), and postmenopausal status affected BMD in women, and only BMI affected BMD in men. Subclinical hypothyroidism was independently associated with a lower risk of osteoporosis (odds ratio 0.657, 95% confidence interval 0.464-0.930) in 4710 postmenopausal women. No apparent association was found between subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical hyperthyroidism defined on single TSH measurement and BMD at the lumbar spine and femur in a large cohort of middle-aged men and women. Subclinical hypothyroidism was independently associated with a lower risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

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