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The subcellular organization of strictosidine biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus epidermis highlights several trans-tonoplast translocations of intermediate metabolites.

Authors
  • Guirimand, Grégory1
  • Anthony Guihur2
  • Ginis, Olivia2
  • Poutrain, Pierre2
  • Héricourt, François3
  • Oudin, Audrey2
  • Lanoue, Arnaud2
  • St-Pierre, Benoit2
  • Burlat, Vincent2
  • Courdavault, Vincent2
Type
Published Article
Journal
FEBS Journal
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Mar 09, 2011
Volume
278
Issue
5
Pages
749–763
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2010.07994.x
PMID: 21205206
Source
Medline
License
Green

Abstract

Catharanthus roseus synthesizes a wide range of valuable monoterpene indole alkaloids, some of which have recently been recognized as functioning in plant defence mechanisms. More specifically, in aerial organ epidermal cells, vacuole-accumulated strictosidine displays a dual fate, being either the precursor of all monoterpene indole alkaloids after export from the vacuole, or the substrate for a defence mechanism based on the massive protein cross-linking, which occurs subsequent to organelle membrane disruption during biotic attacks. Such a mechanism relies on a physical separation between the vacuolar strictosidine-synthesizing enzyme and the nucleus-targeted enzyme catalyzing its activation through deglucosylation. In the present study, we carried out the spatial characterization of this mechanism by a cellular and subcellular study of three enzymes catalyzing the synthesis of the two strictosidine precursors (i.e. tryptamine and secologanin). Using RNA in situ hybridization, we demonstrated that loganic acid O-methyltransferase transcript, catalysing the penultimate step of secologanin synthesis, is specifically localized in the epidermis. A combination of green fluorescent protein imaging, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays and yeast two-hybrid analysis enabled us to establish that both loganic acid O-methyltransferase and the tryptamine-producing enzyme, tryptophan decarboxylase, form homodimers in the cytosol, thereby preventing their passive diffusion to the nucleus. We also showed that the cytochrome P450 secologanin synthase is anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum via a N-terminal helix, thus allowing the production of secologanin on the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Consequently, secologanin and tryptamine must be transported to the vacuole to achieve strictosidine biosynthesis, demonstrating the importance of trans-tonoplast translocation events during these metabolic processes.

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