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The subcellular organisation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Authors
  • Nightingale, Daniel Jh1
  • Geladaki, Aikaterini2
  • Breckels, Lisa M1
  • Oliver, Stephen G3
  • Lilley, Kathryn S4
  • 1 Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QR, United Kingdom; Cambridge Systems Biology Centre, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1GA, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QR, United Kingdom; Cambridge Systems Biology Centre, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1GA, United Kingdom; Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EH, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 3 Cambridge Systems Biology Centre, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1GA, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 4 Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QR, United Kingdom; Cambridge Systems Biology Centre, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1GA, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current opinion in chemical biology
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2019
Volume
48
Pages
86–95
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.cbpa.2018.10.026
PMID: 30503867
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Subcellular protein localisation is essential for the mechanisms that govern cellular homeostasis. The ability to understand processes leading to this phenomenon will therefore enhance our understanding of cellular function. Here we review recent developments in this field with regard to mass spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy and computational prediction methods. We highlight relative strengths and limitations of current methodologies focussing particularly on studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We further present the first cell-wide spatial proteome map of S. cerevisiae, generated using hyperLOPIT, a mass spectrometry-based protein correlation profiling technique. We compare protein subcellular localisation assignments from this map, with two published fluorescence microscopy studies and show that confidence in localisation assignment is attained using multiple orthogonal methods that provide complementary data. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

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