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Study of Star-Forming Regions in the Peculiar Galaxies NGC 660, NGC 1512, NGC 4395, and NGC 4618

Authors
  • Smirnova, K. I.1
  • Wiebe, D. S.2
  • Moiseev, A. V.3
  • Jozsa, G. I. G.4, 5, 6
  • 1 Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg, 620000, Russia , Yekaterinburg (Russia)
  • 2 Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 119017, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
  • 3 Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Arkhyz, 369167, Russia , Nizhnii Arkhyz (Russia)
  • 4 South African Radio Astronomy Observatory, , Cape Town, 79405, South Africa , , Cape Town (South Africa)
  • 5 Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, Makhanda, 6140, South Africa , Makhanda (South Africa)
  • 6 Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Bonn, D-53121, Germany , Bonn (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Astrophysical Bulletin
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2020
Volume
75
Issue
3
Pages
234–246
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1134/S199034132003013X
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Abstract—The star-forming regions (SFRs) in the peculiar galaxies NGC 660, NGC 1512, NGC 4395 and NGC 4618 are studied. The relationships between such characteristics of star forming regions as UV, near- and far-IR fluxes, as well as in the Hα and HI lines, surface brightness in these ranges, and the scatter of the radial velocities of ionized and neutral hydrogen are considered. It is shown that in all the galaxies considered, the IR fluxes from SFRs are less than in the “normal” galaxies, but for different reasons: in the galaxies with signs of recent interaction NGC 660 and NGC 1512, this is due to the low surface brightness of SFRs; in the lopsided galaxies NGC 4395 and NGC 4618, the low brightness of SFRs in the infrared range is due to their compact size. These differences indicate that the star formation process depends not only on the morphological type of a galaxy, but also on many other factors.

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