Affordable Access

Publisher Website

A study on the association of placental and maternal urinary phthalate metabolites.

Authors
  • Liang, Hai-Wei1
  • Snyder, Nathaniel2
  • Wang, Jiebiao3
  • Xun, Xiaoshuang1
  • Yin, Qing3
  • LeWinn, Kaja4
  • Carroll, Kecia N5
  • Bush, Nicole R4, 6
  • Kannan, Kurunthachalam7
  • Barrett, Emily S8
  • Mitchell, Rod T9
  • Tylavsky, Fran10
  • Adibi, Jennifer J11, 12
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
  • 2 Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
  • 3 Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
  • 4 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 5 Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
  • 6 Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 7 Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
  • 8 Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ, USA.
  • 9 MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
  • 10 Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
  • 11 Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. [email protected].
  • 12 Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. [email protected].
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology
Publisher
Springer Nature
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2023
Volume
33
Issue
2
Pages
264–272
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1038/s41370-022-00478-x
PMID: 36114292
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Phthalate exposure in pregnancy is typically estimated using maternal urinary phthalate metabolite levels. Our aim was to evaluate the association of urinary and placental tissue phthalates, and to explore the role of maternal and pregnancy characteristics that may bias estimates. Fifty pregnancies were selected from the CANDLE Study, recruited from 2006 to 2011 in Tennessee. Linear models were used to estimate associations of urinary phthalates (2nd, 3rd trimesters) and placental tissue phthalates (birth). Potential confounders and modifiers were evaluated in categories: temporality (time between urine and placenta sample), fetal sex, demographics, social advantage, reproductive history, medication use, nutrition and adiposity. Molar and quantile normalized phthalates were calculated to facilitate comparison of placental and urinary levels. Metabolites detectable in >80% of both urine and placental samples were MEP, MnBP, MBzP, MECPP, MEOHP, MEHHP, and MEHP. MEP was most abundant in urine (geometric mean [GM] 7.00 ×102 nmol/l) and in placental tissue (GM 2.56 ×104 nmol/l). MEHP was the least abundant in urine (GM 5.32 ×101 nmol/l) and second most abundant in placental tissue (2.04 ×104 nmol/l). In aggregate, MEHP differed the most between urine and placenta (2.21 log units), and MEHHP differed the least (0.07 log units). MECPP was positively associated between urine and placenta (regression coefficient: 0.31 95% CI 0.09, 0.53). Other urine-placenta metabolite associations were modified by measures of social advantage, reproductive history, medication use, and adiposity. Phthalates were ubiquitous in 50 full-term placental samples, as has already been shown in maternal urine. MEP and MEHP were the most abundant. Measurement and comparison of urinary and placental phthalates can advance knowledge on phthalate toxicity in pregnancy and provide insight into the validity and accuracy of relying on maternal urinary concentrations to estimate placental exposures. This is the first report of correlations/associations of urinary and placental tissue phthalates in human pregnancy. Epidemiologists have relied exclusively on maternal urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations to assess exposures in pregnant women and risk to their fetuses. Even though it has not yet been confirmed empirically, it is widely assumed that urinary concentrations are strongly and positively correlated with placental and fetal levels. Our data suggest that may not be the case, and these associations may vary by phthalate metabolite and associations may be modified by measures of social advantage, reproductive history, medication use, and adiposity. © 2022. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature America, Inc.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times