Structure of GlgS from Escherichia coli suggests a role in protein–protein interactions

Affordable Access

Structure of GlgS from Escherichia coli suggests a role in protein–protein interactions

Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
May 25, 2004
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
License
Unknown

Abstract

1741-7007-2-10.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Biology Open AcceResearch article Structure of GlgS from Escherichia coli suggests a role in protein– protein interactions Guennadi Kozlov1, Demetra Elias1, Miroslaw Cygler2 and Kalle Gehring*1 Address: 1Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1Y6, Canada and 2Macromolecular Structure Group, Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, Quebec H4P 2R2, Canada Email: Guennadi Kozlov - [email protected]; Demetra Elias - [email protected]; Miroslaw Cygler - [email protected]; Kalle Gehring* - [email protected] * Corresponding author NMR structureGlgSEscherichia coliglycogen synthesisprotein–protein interactions. Abstract Background: The Escherichia coli protein GlgS is up-regulated in response to starvation stress and its overexpression was shown to stimulate glycogen synthesis. Results: We solved the structure of GlgS from E. coli, a member of an enterobacterial protein family. The protein structure represents a bundle of three α-helices with a short hydrophobic helix sandwiched between two long amphipathic helices. Conclusion: GlgS shows structural homology to Huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A, TOR1 motif domains and tetratricopeptide repeats, suggesting a possible role in protein–protein interactions. Background In response to insufficient levels of nitrogen or other nutrients, cells produce and accumulate glycogen when a carbon source is present in the growth medium [1]. The general steps of glycogen synthesis are initiation (prim- ing), elongation and maturation. The priming step con- sists of a covalent attachment of ADP- or UDP-glucose to an enzyme making α(1,4)-glucosidic linkages followed by initial growth of the linear glucopolymer, α(1,4)-glucan. In eukaryotes, glycogenin plays this initiating role and is required for glycogen synthesis [2,3]. When the α(1,4)- glucan reaches a certain length, it becomes a su

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times