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Sticking together? Re-binding previous other-associated stimuli interferes with self-verification but not partner-verification.

Authors
  • Constable, Merryn D1
  • Knoblich, Günther2
  • 1 Department of Psychology, Northumbria University, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Department of Cognitive Science, Central European University, Hungary. , (Hungary)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta psychologica
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
210
Pages
103167–103167
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2020.103167
PMID: 32853906
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The self-prioritisation and we-prioritisation effects can be observed through faster responses to self-stimuli (self and group) than non-self-stimuli. It remains uncertain if we-prioritisation extends to individual members of one's own group. In light of recent work that implicates memory-based processes in identity-prioritisation effects, the present experiment was developed to determine whether a task-partner's identity relevant information also benefits from an enhanced representation, despite conflicting evidence of partner-prioritisation. To this end, pairs of participants were recruited to perform a joint task. Each partner was assigned a shape and a stranger was also assigned a shape. Participants then completed a shape-to-label matching task where one participant responded if a shape and a label pair matched and the other responded if the shape and a label pair did not match. Halfway through the task the associated identities were switched such that the same shapes and labels were reassigned. Overall, a standard self-prioritisation effect was observed with match-responders making faster responses to self- over partner- and stranger-stimuli. After identities were remapped a decrement in performance was observed for self-trials relative to baseline self-responses. Conversely, responses were faster to partner- and stranger-stimuli relative to baseline performance for each stimulus type. Thus, no evidence was observed for an enhanced representation for task-partner-associated identities. However, an interaction between old and new memory traces for self- and other-associated identities does seem to interfere with self-retrieval and self-verification processes. Crown Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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