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Status of Native Tree Diversity in Relation to Land-Use in the Merhabete District, Ethiopia

Authors
  • Getachew, Goremsu
  • Asfaw, Zebene
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Landscape Ecology
Publisher
De Gruyter Open Sp. z o.o.
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2023
Volume
16
Issue
3
Pages
1–19
Identifiers
DOI: 10.2478/jlecol-2023-0014
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Most studies undertaken on native fodder and fruit species have focused on planting preferences and socioeconomic importance. The focus has been less on diversity aspects. This study aimed to make a comparative investigation on the status of native fodder and fruit tree /shrub diversity and their management in three land types in Merhabete district, North Shewa Zone, Ethiopia. A total of 127 households were randomly selected for interviews on management practices and threats to the targeted species. Furthermore, 90 sampling plots representing three land use types were used for vegetation data collection. Altogether, a total of 34 tree /shrub species were recorded from three land use types in the study area. Out of the 34 tree/shrub species identified, 31 (91.2 %) species were native fodder and fruit tree/shrub species, and the remaining 3 (8.8 %) were exotic tree/shrub species. The mean tree/shrubdiversity, species richness, and species density were significantly higher in the remnant natural forest than in homegarden and parkland (p≤0.05). Likewise, the highest tree basal area was recorded in remnant natural forest, followed by homegarden and parklands. The common management practices for native fodder and fruit species were pollarding, thinning, pruning, lopping, and fencing. Based on the findings, it is concluded that species diversities and stem numbers were lower in parkland than in other land-use types. Therefore, it is recommended that planting native fodder and fruit tree/shrub species on parkland is essential to enhance the conservation and domestication process of the targeted species.

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