Affordable Access

Status, communality, and agency: implications for stereotypes of gender and other groups.

Authors
  • Conway, M
  • Pizzamiglio, M T
  • Mount, L
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of personality and social psychology
Publication Date
Jul 01, 1996
Volume
71
Issue
1
Pages
25–38
Identifiers
PMID: 8709000
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Four studies addressed the hypothesis, based on correspondence bias, that low- relative to high-status individuals are perceived as more communal and less agentic. Study 1 instantiated status in terms of occupations, and findings were as expected. The findings of Study 2 reconciled those of Study 1 and of A.H. Eagly and V.J. Steffen (1984) in that they demonstrated that high-status occupations are differentially construed in terms of their interpersonal communal demands. The hypothesis received clear support in Studies 3 and 4, in which a general instantiation of status independent of occupations, social roles, and gender was adopted. The findings are discussed in terms of gender stereotypes and social role theory of gender (A.H. Eagly, 1987) as well as in terms of other stereotypes.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times