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A state-wide analysis of pediatric scald burns by tap water, 2016-2018.

Authors
  • Bentivegna, Kathryn1
  • McCollum, Sarah2
  • Wu, Rong3
  • Hunter, Amy A4
  • 1 University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Independent Researcher, New Haven, CT, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 Biostatistics Center, Connecticut Convergence Institute for Translation in Regenerative Engineering, UConn Health, Farmington, CT, United States. , (United States)
  • 4 Injury Prevention Center, Connecticut Children's and Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, United States; Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut, School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, United States; Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, United States; Trinity College, Hartford, CT, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Burns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2020
Volume
46
Issue
8
Pages
1805–1812
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2020.06.009
PMID: 32646547
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Unsafe tap water temperatures (>120 °F) are a risk factor for pediatric burns, which may disproportionally impact low-income, urban communities. We sought to estimate the incidence and demographic characteristics of tap water burns and their association with housing characteristics. We performed a secondary data analysis to summarize emergency department discharge records from 2016 to 2018 involving children <18 years with an ICD-10-CM code for tap water burn (X11), and town-level housing data from the American Community Survey. Unpaired student's t-test and spearman's correlation analysis were performed for comparative analyses. A total of 146 tap water burn visits were identified, representing an incidence of 2 per 10,000 ED visits. The majority of cases were male, non-Hispanic White, of public insurance type, and from an urban CT town. The median age was 3 years, with 58% of cases <5 years. Towns with at least one tap water burn had a significantly higher average percentage of multi-family unit and renter housing as compared to towns with no tap water burns (p < 0.0001). Our results identified a significant number of tap water burns in children. Primary prevention efforts targeting education or regulation of water temperatures may work to reduce burns in underserved areas. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

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