Affordable Access

Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to standard micro-rough and electropolished implant materials.

Authors
  • 1
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine
Publication Date
Volume
18
Issue
6
Pages
1151–1156
Identifiers
PMID: 17268867
Source
Medline

Abstract

Implant-associated infections can cause serious complications including osteomyelitis and soft tissue damage, and are a great problem due to the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In some cases, antibiotic-loaded beads which release the antibiotic locally have been used, however such systems may lead to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, as seen with gentamicin-loaded beads. Hence modifying the actual metal implant surface to inhibit or reduce initial bacterial adhesion may be an alternative option. This study describes the visualisation and quantification of S. aureus adhering to standard micro-rough 'commercially pure' titanium (TS) and Ti-6Al-7Nb (NS) surfaces, electropolished titanium (TE) and Ti-6Al-7Nb (NE) surfaces, and standard electropolished stainless steel (SS). Qualitative and quantitative results of S. aureus on the different surfaces correlated with each other, and showed significantly more live bacteria on NS than on the other surfaces, whilst there was no significant difference between the amount of bacteria on TS, TE, NE and SS surfaces. The results showed a significant decrease in the amount of bacteria adhering to the NE compared to standard NS surfaces. Such an observation suggests that the NS surface encouraged S. aureus adhesion, and could lead to higher infection rates in vivo. Hence electropolishing Ti-6Al-7Nb surfaces could be advantageous in osteosynthesis areas in minimising bacterial adhesion and lowering the rate of infection.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments