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Stand-up exercise training facilitates muscle recovery from disuse atrophy by stimulating myogenic satellite cell proliferation in mice.

Authors
  • Itoh, Yuta1
  • Hayakawa, Kimihide2
  • Mori, Tomohiro3
  • Agata, Nobuhide4
  • Inoue-Miyazu, Masumi5
  • Murakami, Taro6
  • Sokabe, Masahiro7
  • Kawakami, Keisuke3
  • 1 Physical and Occupational Therapy Program, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan Faculty of Rehabilitation Science, Nagoya Gakuin University, Seto, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 2 Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 Physical and Occupational Therapy Program, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 4 Physical and Occupational Therapy Program, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Tokoha University, Hamamatsu, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 5 Aiche Medical College for Physical and Occupational Therapy, Kiyosu, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 6 Faculty of Wellness, Sigakkan University, Ohbu, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 7 Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan Department of Physiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Physiological Reports
Publisher
Wiley (Physiological Reports)
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2014
Volume
2
Issue
11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.14814/phy2.12185
PMID: 25367692
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Determining the cellular and molecular recovery processes in inactivity - or unloading -induced atrophied muscles should improve rehabilitation strategies. We assessed the effects of stand-up exercise (SE) training on the recovery of atrophied skeletal muscles in male mice. Mice were trained to stand up and press an elevated lever in response to a light-tone cue preceding an electric foot shock and then subjected to tail suspension (TS) for 2 weeks to induce disuse atrophy in hind limb muscles. After release from TS, mice were divided into SE-trained (SE cues: 25 times per set, two sets per day) and non-SE-trained groups. Seven days after the training, average myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of the soleus muscle was significantly greater in the SE-trained group than in the non-SE-trained group (1843 ± 194 μm(2) vs. 1315 ± 153 μm(2)). Mean soleus muscle CSA in the SE trained group was not different from that in the CON group subjected to neither TS nor SE training (2005 ± 196 μm(2)), indicating that SE training caused nearly complete recovery from muscle atrophy. The number of myonuclei per myofiber was increased by ~60% in the SE-trained group compared with the non-SE-trained and CON groups (0.92 ± 0.03 vs. 0.57 ± 0.03 and 0.56 ± 0.11, respectively). The number of proliferating myonuclei, identified by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine staining, increased within the first few days of SE training. Thus, it is highly likely that myogenic satellite cells proliferated rapidly in atrophied muscles in response to SE training and fused with existing myofibers to reestablish muscle mass.

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