Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Stakeholder perspectives on the Kisoboka intervention: A behavioral and structural intervention to reduce hazardous alcohol use and improve HIV care engagement among men living with HIV in Ugandan fishing communities.

Authors
  • Naigino, Rose1
  • Miller, Amanda P2
  • Ediau, Michael1
  • Anecho, Asha3
  • Senoga, Umar3
  • Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona3
  • Wanyenze, Rhoda K3
  • Mukasa, Barbara4
  • Hahn, Judith A5
  • Reed, Elizabeth6
  • Sileo, Katelyn M7
  • Kiene, Susan M8
  • 1 Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Diego State University School of Public Health, CA, USA; Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda. , (Uganda)
  • 2 Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Diego State University School of Public Health, CA, USA.
  • 3 Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda. , (Uganda)
  • 4 Mildmay Uganda, Kampala, Uganda. , (Uganda)
  • 5 Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 6 Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, San Diego State University, CA, USA.
  • 7 Department of Public Health, University of Texas at San Antonio, TX, USA.
  • 8 Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Diego State University School of Public Health, CA, USA; Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (Uganda)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Drug and alcohol dependence
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2023
Volume
253
Pages
111011–111011
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2023.111011
PMID: 37952352
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

East Africa's fishing communities experience a high burden of two interrelated and frequently co-occurring health issues: HIV and hazardous alcohol use. Nearly two-thirds of Ugandan fisherfolk men meet the criteria for harmful alcohol use. We developed a multilevel intervention to reduce hazardous alcohol use and improve HIV care engagement among fisherfolk men living with HIV (LWHIV) in Wakiso district, Uganda. This is a qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives on the appropriateness, acceptability, and feasibility of a multilevel intervention for fisherfolk men LWHIV. The proposed intervention, Kisoboka ("It is possible!"), combines a structural component [changing the mode of work payments from cash to mobile money] with a behavioral component [motivational interviewing-based counseling combined with content using behavioral economic principles to promote behavior change]. We conducted one focus group (n=7) and eight in-depth interviews with fisherfolk men LWHIV and 19 key informant (KI) interviews with health workers, employers, and community leaders. These explored the appropriateness, acceptability, and feasibility of specific key intervention components. Overall, stakeholders' perspectives supported high intervention acceptability and perceived appropriateness of the proposed intervention. It was perceived to be feasible with some caveats of recommendations for overcoming potential implementation challenges identified (e.g., having a friend assist with documenting savings and alcohol use if an individual was unable to write themselves) which are discussed. This work highlights the potential of the Kisoboka intervention and the importance of early engagement of key stakeholders in the intervention development process to ensure appropriateness, acceptability, feasibility, and socio-cultural fit. Copyright © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times