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Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia Infection of Cats and Cat Fleas in Northeast Thailand.

Authors
  • Phomjareet, Sirirat1
  • Chaveerach, Prapansak1
  • Suksawat, Fanan2
  • Jiang, Ju3
  • Richards, Allen L3, 4, 5
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Public Health and Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand. , (Thailand)
  • 2 Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand. , (Thailand)
  • 3 Rickettsial Diseases Research Program, Infectious Diseases Directorate, Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
  • 4 Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
  • 5 International Visiting Scholar, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand. , (Thailand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Vector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont, N.Y.)
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2020
Volume
20
Issue
8
Pages
566–571
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/vbz.2019.2564
PMID: 32744925
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Rickettsia species cause rickettsioses, which are zoonotic diseases found worldwide, and are transmitted by arthropods such as lice, fleas, ticks, and mites. In Thailand, flea infestations are common among cats and dogs. This study aimed at determining the exposure to spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) of cats in surrounding areas of Rajabhat Maha Sarakham University, Muang district, Maha Sarakham province and rickettsial infection among cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis, collected from dogs of the surrounding area of Waeng Noi district, Khon Kaen province. Forty-two cat sera were assessed for IgG antibody titers against SFGR by a group-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The prevalence of seroreactive cats was 4.76% (2/42). DNA preparations from 23 individual cat fleas from three dogs were assessed by Rickettsia genus-specific, group-specific, and species-specific quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays. Positive results were confirmed by ompB gene fragment sequencing. Twenty-one of 23 cat fleas were positive for Rickettsia asembonensis, and the other two DNA preparations were negative for rickettsial DNA. This study's finding indicates that companion cats and dogs in Northeast Thailand are exposed to SFGR and that exposure may be due to infection with R. asembonensis, an organism known to infect humans, monkeys, and dogs. Clinicians for humans and animals in Northeast Thailand should be aware of rickettsial infections among their patients.

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