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Speech as an indicator for psychosocial stress: A network analytic approach.

Authors
  • Kappen, Mitchel1, 2, 3
  • Hoorelbeke, Kristof4
  • Madhu, Nilesh5
  • Demuynck, Kris5
  • Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne6, 7
  • 1 Department of Head and Skin, Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, , Ghent University, University Hospital Ghent (UZ Ghent), Corneel Heymanslaan 10-13K12, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. [email protected] , (Belgium)
  • 2 Ghent Experimental Psychiatry (GHEP) Lab, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. [email protected] , (Belgium)
  • 3 Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. [email protected] , (Belgium)
  • 4 Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 5 IDLab, Ghent University - imec, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 6 Department of Head and Skin, Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, , Ghent University, University Hospital Ghent (UZ Ghent), Corneel Heymanslaan 10-13K12, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 7 Ghent Experimental Psychiatry (GHEP) Lab, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Behavior Research Methods
Publisher
Springer - Psychonomic Society
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2022
Volume
54
Issue
2
Pages
910–921
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3758/s13428-021-01670-x
PMID: 34357541
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Recently, the possibilities of detecting psychosocial stress from speech have been discussed. Yet, there are mixed effects and a current lack of clarity in relations and directions for parameters derived from stressed speech. The aim of the current study is - in a controlled psychosocial stress induction experiment - to apply network modeling to (1) look into the unique associations between specific speech parameters, comparing speech networks containing fundamental frequency (F0), jitter, mean voiced segment length, and Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio (HNR) pre- and post-stress induction, and (2) examine how changes pre- versus post-stress induction (i.e., change network) in each of the parameters are related to changes in self-reported negative affect. Results show that the network of speech parameters is similar after versus before the stress induction, with a central role of HNR, which shows that the complex interplay and unique associations between each of the used speech parameters is not impacted by psychosocial stress (aim 1). Moreover, we found a change network (consisting of pre-post stress difference values) with changes in jitter being positively related to changes in self-reported negative affect (aim 2). These findings illustrate - for the first time in a well-controlled but ecologically valid setting - the complex relations between different speech parameters in the context of psychosocial stress. Longitudinal and experimental studies are required to further investigate these relationships and to test whether the identified paths in the networks are indicative of causal relationships. © 2021. The Author(s).

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