Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Spectroscopic evidence of keto-enol tautomerism in deliquesced malonic acid particles.

Authors
  • Ghorai, Suman
  • Laskin, Alexander
  • Tivanski, Alexei V
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Physical Chemistry A
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
May 05, 2011
Volume
115
Issue
17
Pages
4373–4380
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1021/jp112360x
PMID: 21480651
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and optical microscopy coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR) have been applied to observe hygroscopic growth and chemical changes in malonic acid particles deposited on substrates. The extent of the hygroscopic growth of particles has been quantified in terms of the corresponding water-to-solute ratios (WSR) based on STXM/NEXAFS and micro-FTIR data sets. WSR values derived separately from two applied methods displayed a remarkable agreement with previous data reported in the literature. Comparison of NEXAFS and FTIR spectra acquired at different relative humidity (RH) shows efficient keto-enol tautomerization of malonic acid, with the enol form dominating at higher RH. The keto-enol equilibrium constants were calculated using relevant peak intensities in the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS spectra as a function of RH. We report strong dependence of the equilibrium constant on RH, with measured values of 0.18 ± 0.03, 1.11 ± 0.14, and 2.33 ± 0.37 corresponding to 2, 50, and 90% RH, respectively. Enols are important intermediates in aldol condensation reactions pertaining to formation and atmospheric aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The present knowledge assumes that constituents of atmospheric deliquesced particles undergo aqueous chemistry with kinetic and equilibrium constants analogous to reactions in bulk solutions, which would estimate absolute dominance of the keto form of carboxylic acids. For instance, the keto-enol equilibrium constant of malonic acid in diluted aqueous solution is <10(-4). Our results suggest that in deliquesced micrometer-size particles, carboxylic acids may exist in predominantly enol forms that need to be explicitly considered in atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times