Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Spectral Resolution Development in Children With Normal Hearing and With Cochlear Implants: A Review of Behavioral Studies.

Authors
  • Jahn, Kelly N1, 2
  • Arenberg, Julie G3, 4
  • Horn, David L5, 6
  • 1 Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.
  • 2 Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The University of Texas at Dallas.
  • 3 Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
  • 4 Eaton-Peabody Laboratories, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston.
  • 5 Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle.
  • 6 Division of Otolaryngology, Seattle Children's Hospital, WA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
Publication Date
Apr 04, 2022
Volume
65
Issue
4
Pages
1646–1658
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00307
PMID: 35201848
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This review article provides a theoretical overview of the development of spectral resolution in children with normal hearing (cNH) and in those who use cochlear implants (CIs), with an emphasis on methodological considerations. The aim was to identify key directions for future research on spectral resolution development in children with CIs. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to summarize and synthesize previously published behavioral research on spectral resolution development in normal and impaired auditory systems. In cNH, performance on spectral resolution tasks continues to improve through the teenage years and is likely driven by gradual maturation of across-channel intensity resolution. A small but growing body of evidence from children with CIs suggests a more complex relationship between spectral resolution development, patient demographics, and the quality of the CI electrode-neuron interface. Future research should aim to distinguish between the effects of patient-specific variables and the underlying physiology on spectral resolution abilities in children of all ages who are hard of hearing and use auditory prostheses.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times