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The Arabidopsis thaliana cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases CRK6 and CRK7 protect against apoplastic oxidative stress

Authors
  • Idänheimo, Niina
  • Gauthier, Adrien
  • Salojärvi, Jarkko
  • Siligato, Riccardo
  • Brosché, Mikael
  • Kollist, Hannes
  • Mähönen, Ari Pekka
  • Kangasjärvi, Jaakko
  • Wrzaczek, Michael1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 5, 6
  • 1 Division of Plant Biology
  • 2 Department of Biosciences
  • 3 University of Helsinki
  • 4 Institute of Biotechnology
  • 5 Institute of Technology
  • 6 University of Tartu
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2014
Volume
445
Issue
2
Pages
457–462
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/ars.2013.5662
Source
Elsevier
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Receptor-like kinases are important regulators of many different processes in plants. Despite their large number only a few have been functionally characterized. One of the largest subgroups of receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis is the cysteine-rich receptor like kinases (CRKs). High sequence similarity among the CRKs has been suggested as major cause for functional redundancy. The genomic localization of CRK genes in back-to-back repeats has made their characterization through mutant analysis unpractical. Expression profiling has linked the CRKs with reactive oxygen species, important signaling molecules in plants. Here we have investigated the role of two CRKs, CRK6 and CRK7, and analyzed their role in extracellular ROS signaling. CRK6 and CRK7 are active protein kinases with differential preference for divalent cations. Our results suggest that CRK7 is involved in mediating the responses to extracellular but not chloroplastic ROS production.

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