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Spatial Representations of Granule Cells and Mossy Cells of the Dentate Gyrus.

Authors
  • GoodSmith, Douglas1
  • Chen, Xiaojing1
  • Wang, Cheng1
  • Kim, Sang Hoon2
  • Song, Hongjun3
  • Burgalossi, Andrea4
  • Christian, Kimberly M2
  • Knierim, James J5
  • 1 Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.
  • 2 Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD 21205 USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD 21205 USA.
  • 3 Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD 21205 USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD 21205 USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD 21205 USA.
  • 4 Werner-Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neuroscience, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 5 Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD 21205 USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuron
Publication Date
Feb 08, 2017
Volume
93
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2016.12.026
PMID: 28132828
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are thought to be essential to memory function by decorrelating overlapping input patterns (pattern separation). A second excitatory cell type in the dentate gyrus, the mossy cell, forms an intricate circuit with granule cells, CA3c pyramidal cells, and local interneurons, but the influence of mossy cells on dentate function is often overlooked. Multiple tetrode recordings, supported by juxtacellular recording techniques, showed that granule cells fired very sparsely, whereas mossy cells in the hilus fired promiscuously in multiple locations and in multiple environments. The activity patterns of these cell types thus represent different environments through distinct computational mechanisms: sparse coding in granule cells and changes in firing field locations in mossy cells.

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