Affordable Access

The spatial distribution of human immunoglobulin genes within the nucleus: evidence for gene topography independent of cell type and transcriptional activity.

Authors
  • Parreira, L
  • Telhada, M
  • Ramos, C
  • Hernandez, R
  • Neves, H
  • Carmo-Fonseca, M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Human genetics
Publication Date
Oct 01, 1997
Volume
100
Issue
5-6
Pages
588–594
Identifiers
PMID: 9341877
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The three-dimensional positioning of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes within the nucleus of human cells was investigated using in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy. The visualization of heavy and light chain genes in B-lymphoid cells showed that the three Ig genes are differentially and nonrandomly distributed in different nuclear subvolumes: the kappa genes were found to be preferentially confined to an outer nuclear volume, whereas the gamma and lambda genes consistently occupied more central positions within the nucleus, the lambda genes being more interior when compared with the gamma genes. The data further show that these overall topographical distributions are independent of gene transcriptional activity and are conserved in different cell types. Although subtle gene movements within those defined topographical regions cannot be excluded by this study, the results indicate that tissue specificity of gene expression is not accompanied by drastic changes in gene nuclear topography, rather suggesting that gene organization within the nucleus may be primarily dependent on structural constraints imposed on the respective chromosomes.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times