Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Soluble co-signaling molecules predict long-term graft outcome in kidney-transplanted patients.

Authors
  • Melendreras, Susana G
  • Martínez-Camblor, Pablo
  • Menéndez, Aurora
  • Bravo-Mendoza, Cristina
  • González-Vidal, Ana
  • Coto, Eliecer
  • Díaz-Corte, Carmen
  • Ruiz-Ortega, Marta
  • López-Larrea, Carlos
  • Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz
Type
Published Article
Journal
PLoS ONE
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2014
Volume
9
Issue
12
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113396
PMID: 25478957
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Co-signaling molecules are responsible for full T-cell activation after solid organ transplantation. Their increased expression can lead to the release of a soluble form that can modulate the immune response post-transplantation. We analyzed the presence of co-signaling molecules (sCD30, sCD40, sCD137, sCTLA-4, sCD80, sCD28, sCD40L, sPD-1, and sPD-L1) in serum from kidney-transplanted patients (n = 59) obtained at different times (before transplantation, and 15 days, 3 months and 1 year post-transplantation) and their contribution to graft outcome was evaluated using principal component analysis. Before transplantation, high levels of soluble co-signaling molecules (mainly sCD30, sCD137 and sCD40) were detected in all patients. These molecules were modulated soon after receiving an allograft but never attained similar levels to those of healthy controls. A signature based on the determination of six soluble co-stimulatory (sCD30, sCD40, sCD137 and sCD40L) and co-inhibitory (sPD-1 and sPD-L1) molecules at 3 months post-transplantation allowed a group of patients to be identified (27.12%) with a worse long-term graft outcome. Patients with high levels of soluble molecules showed a progressive and gradual deterioration of kidney function (increased creatinine and proteinuria levels and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate) over time and a higher risk of graft loss at 6 years post-transplantation than patients with low levels of these molecules (62.55% versus 5.14%, p<0.001). Thus, our data show an aberrant expression of soluble co-signaling molecules in kidney-transplanted patients whose quantification at 3 months post-transplantation might be a useful biomarker of immune status and help to predict long-term graft evolution.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times