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Sociodemographic disparities in survival for adolescents and young adults with cancer differ by health insurance status.

Authors
  • DeRouen, Mindy C1
  • Parsons, Helen M2
  • Kent, Erin E3
  • Pollock, Brad H4
  • Keegan, Theresa H M5
  • 1 Cancer Prevention Institute of California, 2201 Walnut Ave, Suite 300, Fremont, CA, 94538, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA.
  • 3 Outcomes Research Branch, Healthcare Delivery Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD, 20850, USA.
  • 4 Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Med Sci 1-C, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
  • 5 Division of Hematology and Oncology, UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, 4501 X Street, Suite 3016, Sacramento, CA, 95817, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer Causes & Control
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2017
Volume
28
Issue
8
Pages
841–851
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10552-017-0914-y
PMID: 28660357
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Lacking or having public insurance was consistently associated with shorter survival, while disparities according to race/ethnicity and neighborhood SES were greater among AYAs with private/military insurance. While health insurance coverage associates with survival, remaining racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities among AYAs with cancer suggest additional social factors also need consideration in intervention and policy development.

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