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Social Pharmacology: Integrating Pharmaceutical and Social Science Research on Drug Effects

Authors
  • Montagne, Michael1
  • 1 Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 179 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115, USA , Boston (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Drug information journal : DIJ / Drug Information Association
Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2004
Volume
38
Issue
4
Pages
315–320
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/009286150403800402
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Social pharmacology is the study of the influence of social and cultural variables on drug effects and use. It considers concepts and variables that in the past have been called “nonspecific” or “nonpharmacological” in nature. Social pharmacology refers to those variables that are not pharmaceutical in nature, but that still can have a profound influence on drug action and the occurrence of specific drug effects as perceived and interpreted by the user. Research on these variables, such as suggestibility, knowledge and information, user set, setting, and attribution, has been conducted for many years. Social pharmacology provides a framework for identifying and classifying variables and how they function to modify drug action to produce drug effects in humans. It is the primary approach for integrating pharmaceutical variables with social and cultural variables to assist in explaining and understanding user-generated descriptions of their drug experiences, with the goal of improving outcomes of patient drug therapy.

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