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Social cognition or social class and culture? On the interpretation of differences in social cognitive performance.

Authors
  • Dodell-Feder, David1
  • Ressler, Kerry J2, 3
  • Germine, Laura T3, 4
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
  • 2 Division of Depression and Anxiety, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA, USA.
  • 3 Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 4 Institute for Technology in Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Psychological Medicine
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
50
Issue
1
Pages
133–145
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S003329171800404X
PMID: 30616706
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The ability to understand others' mental states carries profound consequences for mental and physical health, making efforts at validly and reliably assessing mental state understanding (MSU) of utmost importance. However, the most widely used and current NIMH-recommended task for assessing MSU - the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (RMET) - suffers from potential assessment issues, including reliance on a participant's vocabulary/intelligence and the use of culturally biased stimuli. Here, we evaluate the impact of demographic and sociocultural factors (age, gender, education, ethnicity, race) on the RMET and other social and non-social cognitive tasks in an effort to determine the extent to which the RMET may be unduly influenced by participant characteristics. In total, 40 248 international, native-/primarily English-speaking participants between the ages of 10 and 70 completed one of five measures on TestMyBrain.org: RMET, a shortened version of RMET, a multiracial emotion identification task, an emotion discrimination task, and a non-social/non-verbal processing speed task (digit symbol matching). Contrary to other tasks, performance on the RMET increased across the lifespan. Education, race, and ethnicity explained more variance in RMET performance than the other tasks, and differences between levels of education, race, and ethnicity were more pronounced for the RMET than the other tasks such that more highly educated, non-Hispanic, and White/Caucasian individuals performed best. These data suggest that the RMET may be unduly influenced by social class and culture, posing a serious challenge to assessing MSU in clinical populations given shared variance between social status and psychiatric illness.

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