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Slope Failure Initiation by Seismic Loading from Different Sources

Authors
  • Kocharyan, G. G.1
  • Besedina, A. N.1
  • Kishkina, S. B.1
  • Pavlov, D. V.1
  • Sharafiev, Z. Z.1
  • Kamenev, P. A.2
  • 1 Sadovsky Institute of Geosphere Dynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 119334, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
  • 2 Institute of Marine Geology and Geophysics, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, 693022, Russia , Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk (Russia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Izvestiya, Physics of the Solid Earth
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2021
Volume
57
Issue
5
Pages
614–626
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1134/S1069351321050116
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Yellow

Abstract

Abstract—We present the results of laboratory studies of slope failure criteria by dynamic impulse loading in the range of peak ground velocities (PGV) between 0.003 and 1.3 m/s and peak ground accelerations (PGA) between 0.01 to above 170g. Critical parameter values of the dynamic loads acting on model slopes are established. The minimum PGA value at which landslide initiation was observed is significantly higher than critical acceleration calculated in the quasi static approach. At the same time, with close static factors of safety, critical parameters for underwater and dry slopes are comparable notwithstanding the fact that the character of the ground motion after initiation in the experiments under water strongly differs from that on the dry slopes. It is shown that there are minimal PGA and PGV values ​​at which irreversible slope deformations take place. If acceleration is lower than the minimum PGA value PGAmin, no significant irreversible deformations occur at any PGV. If mass velocity is below PGVmin, than at PGA > PGAmin, irreversible deformations are observed, and a repeated impact may cause a slope to fail. Using Newmark approximation, slope stability is calculated for various impact types: earthquakes of different magnitudes, ripple-fired explosions, and high-yield underground explosions.

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