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Sleep Deprivation Alters the Pituitary Stress Transcriptome in Male and Female Mice

Authors
  • Oyola, Mario G.1, 2, 3
  • Shupe, Elizabeth A.1
  • Soltis, Anthony R.3, 4
  • Sukumar, Gauthaman3, 4
  • Paez-Pereda, Marcelo5
  • Larco, Darwin O.1
  • Wilkerson, Matthew D.4, 6
  • Rothwell, Stephen6
  • Dalgard, Clifton L.4, 6
  • Wu, T. John1, 2
  • 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD , (United States)
  • 2 Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD , (United States)
  • 3 Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, MD , (United States)
  • 4 Collaborative Health Initiative Research Program, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD , (United States)
  • 5 Department of Translational Research in Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich , (Germany)
  • 6 Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Endocrinology
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Oct 09, 2019
Volume
10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fendo.2019.00676
PMID: 31649619
PMCID: PMC6794367
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Poor sleep hygiene is a growing problem, with detrimental effects on many biological systems. The pituitary gland plays a crucial role in the regulation of sleep and the stress response, and its dysfunction leads to sleep-related disorders. However, the interaction between these critical functions remains unclear. Thus, we performed a comparative, whole-transcriptome, analysis to identify stress-induced genes and relevant pathways that may be affected by sleep deprivation. One day following 12 h of Paradoxical Sleep Deprivation (PSD), mice were restrained for 20 min. Gene expression changes in the pituitary were assessed via RNA-Seq and Gene Ontology in PSD and/or restrained groups compared to controls. We show that restraint triggers transcriptional responses involved in hormone secretion, the glucocorticoid response, and apoptosis in both sexes, with 285 differentially expressed genes in females and 93 in males. When PSD preceded restraint stress, the numbers of differentially expressed genes increased to 613 in females and 580 in males. The pituitary transcriptome of restraint+PSD animals was enriched for microglia and macrophage proliferation, cellular response to corticosteroids, and apoptosis, among others. Finally, we identify sex-specific differences in restraint-induced genes following PSD. These findings provide genetic targets to consider when studying sleep and the response to stress.

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