Affordable Access

Access to the full text

The single flagellum of Leishmania has a fixed polarisation of its asymmetric beat

Authors
  • Wang, Ziyin1
  • Beneke, Tom1
  • Gluenz, Eva2
  • Wheeler, Richard John3
  • 1 Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford
  • 2 The Wellcome Centre for Integrative Parasitology, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow
  • 3 Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Cell Science
Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Publication Date
Oct 22, 2020
Volume
133
Issue
20
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1242/jcs.246637
PMID: 33093230
PMCID: PMC7595685
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Research Article
License
Green

Abstract

Highlighted Article: By using high speed, high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of swimming Leishmania cells, we showed that the asymmetric flagellar beat always wafts in the same direction and investigate which structures are involved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times