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A single center retrospective review of hair tourniquet syndrome and a proposed treatment algorithm.

Authors
  • Bean, Jonathan F1
  • Hebal, Ferdynand2
  • Hunter, Catherine J3
  • 1 Division of Pediatric Surgery, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Division of Pediatric Surgery, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 Division of Pediatric Surgery, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Pediatric Surgery
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2015
Volume
50
Issue
9
Pages
1583–1585
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2014.11.041
PMID: 25783322
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Hair tourniquet syndrome (HTS) is a rare disorder characterized by a hair becoming tightly wound around an appendage. There is little known about the epidemiology, optimal treatment, or indications for surgical intervention in HTS. We hypothesized that HTS could be readily diagnosed and treated in the pediatric emergency department and we sought out factors predictive of surgical intervention. We performed a single center retrospective review of all patients who presented with a hair tourniquet from May 2004 till March 2014. Eighty-one patients were diagnosed with HTS, ranging in age from 2 weeks to 22 years. Of these patients, 69 were located on the toes, 5 on fingers, and 7 on genitalia. The average ages for each location were statistically different (p<0.0001). Ninety-four percent of patients were successfully treated by nonoperative means. Cellulitis was found in two patients. Tissue necrosis occurred in one patient. HTS is an uncommon disorder and location differs with age. Chemical depilatory agents should be a first line treatment for this condition in most patients. If chemical tourniquet release fails, then the patient should undergo mechanical tourniquet release. If edema, erythema and pain fail to resolve after tourniquet release, then persistent hair tourniquet should be investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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