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Simultaneous appraisals of pathway and probable health risk associated with trace metals contamination in groundwater from Barapukuria coal basin, Bangladesh.

Authors
  • Habib, Md Ahosan1
  • Islam, Abu Reza Md Towfiqul2
  • Bodrud-Doza, Md3
  • Mukta, Farhana Afroj4
  • Khan, Rahat5
  • Bakar Siddique, Md Abu6
  • Phoungthong, Khamphe7
  • Techato, Kuaanan1
  • 1 Faculty of Environmental Management, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, 90112, Thailand. , (Thailand)
  • 2 Department of Disaster Management, Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur, 5400, Bangladesh. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Bangladesh)
  • 3 Climate Change Programme, BRAC, Dhaka, 1212, Bangladesh. , (Bangladesh)
  • 4 Department of Disaster Management, Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur, 5400, Bangladesh. , (Bangladesh)
  • 5 Institute of Nuclear Science & Technology, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Savar, Dhaka, 1349, Bangladesh. , (Bangladesh)
  • 6 Institute of National Analytical Research and Service (INARS), Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (BCSIR), Dhaka, 1205, Bangladesh. , (Bangladesh)
  • 7 Environmental Assessment and Technology for Hazardous Waste Management Research Center, Faculty of Environmental Management, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, 90112, Thailand. , (Thailand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Chemosphere
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2020
Volume
242
Pages
125183–125183
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.125183
PMID: 31675577
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In this study, we analyzed 33 groundwater samples from the Barapukuria coal basin (BCB), Bangladesh for 10 trace metals (TMs) using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Pathways and associated probable health risk were appraised by employing multivariate statistical approaches, health risk model and Monte-Carlo simulation. Except for the Cu, Cr and Zn concentrations, the mean concentrations of all TMs in the basin were above the permissible water quality limits set by Bangladesh and international standards. Correlation coefficient and principal component analysis, supported by cluster analysis indicated that anthropogenic inputs were more contributed to the elevated concentrations of TMs compared to geogenic sources as the major reasons of groundwater pollution in the basin. The results of non-carcinogenic risk appraisal depicted that hazard index (HI) values for both adults and children were exceeded the safe limits (>1.0) except for few locations, indicating serious health risks on the human via oral and dermal absorption pathways. However, the carcinogenic risk values of Cd and Cr exceeded the US EPA range of 1 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-4, with higher risk for children than adults, with oral intake as the key exposure pathway. A sensitivity study identified the concentration of Cr, exposure frequency and ingestion rate for carcinogenic effect as the most sensitive parameters influencing the probable health risk. Overall, the results suggest that Cr in drinking water could cause detrimental effects to exposed local residents; thus, strict health regulation and groundwater management should concentrate on Cr contamination in groundwater from the coal basin. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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