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A simple test to assess cerebrovascular reserve capacity using transcranial Doppler sonography and acetazolamide.

Authors
  • Piepgras, A
  • Schmiedek, P
  • Leinsinger, G
  • Haberl, R L
  • Kirsch, C M
  • Einhäupl, K M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation
Publication Date
Sep 01, 1990
Volume
21
Issue
9
Pages
1306–1311
Identifiers
PMID: 2204147
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The goal of this study was the development of a simple bedside test to assess cerebrovascular reserve capacity using transcranial Doppler sonography. We studied 33 normal persons at rest and after stimulation of cerebral blood flow with 1 g acetazolamide. Their mean +/- SD increase in blood flow velocity in 54 middle cerebral arteries 10 minutes after stimulation was 24.4 +/- 9.2 cm/sec. We tried to validate the increase in blood flow velocity as cerebrovascular reserve capacity in 21 patients with obstructive carotid artery disease and symptoms of cerebral ischemia. The patients were studied using transcranial Doppler sonography and xenon-133 dynamic single-photon emission computed tomography after acetazolamide stimulation. Their increases in blood flow velocity (delta FV) and increases in cerebral blood flow (delta CBF) correlated significantly in both hemispheres (asymptomatic: Y = 0.32X + 10.65, r = 0.45, p = 0.04; symptomatic: Y = 0.36X + 2.28, r = 0.59, p = 0.004). There was no significant difference between the slopes of the regression lines. Blood flow velocity and cerebral blood flow at rest were not correlated. The increase in blood flow velocity after acetazolamide stimulation offers a simple and reliable method for assessing cerebrovascular reserve capacity.

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