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A simple method to detect Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato proteins in different sub-cellular compartments by immunofluorescence.

Authors
  • Brock, Aaron M1
  • Jutras, Brandon L2
  • 1 Department of Biochemistry, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States; Fralin Life Sciences Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States; Molecular and Cellular Biology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Biochemistry, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States; Fralin Life Sciences Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States; Molecular and Cellular Biology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, United States; Center for Emerging, Zoonotic and Arthropod-borne Pathogens, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, United States; Translational Biology, Medicine, and Health, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ticks and tick-borne diseases
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2021
Volume
12
Issue
6
Pages
101808–101808
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ttbdis.2021.101808
PMID: 34455142
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Spirochaetes constitute a unique phylum of bacteria, many of which cause severe clinical diseases. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi s.l.)-the primary agent of Lyme borreliosis (LB)-is a quintessential member of this poorly understood phylum and the leading cause of tick-borne illness throughout most of the northern hemisphere. Despite its importance in human health, we lack a fundamental understanding of how B. burgdorferi s.l. is able to accomplish basic physiological tasks, such as DNA replication/segregation, and cell elongation or division. Recent advances in molecular tools to probe these essential cellular processes are great strides forward but require genetic manipulation. The latter is important since not all agents of LB are genetically tractable. Here, we describe a single method that is capable of fluorescently labeling B. burgdorferi s.l. proteins in different sub-cellular compartments. A comparative analysis of six different methods indicates that our optimized procedure outperforms all others and is the first to localize a cytoplasmic protein in B. burgdorferi s.l. by immunofluorescence. We contend that this strategy could be easily adapted to study the localization of any protein, in many Borrelia genospecies, information that will yield functional insights into the complex biology of this fascinating group of bacteria. In addition, it may provide new avenues of research in both in situ studies and in Lyme diagnostics. Copyright © 2021. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

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