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SiJunZi decoction ameliorates bone quality and redox homeostasis and regulates advanced glycation end products/receptor for advanced glycation end products and WNT/β-catenin signaling pathways in diabetic mice.

Authors
  • Dai, Xuan1
  • Liu, Yage2
  • Liu, Tianyuan3
  • Zhang, Yueyi4
  • Wang, Shan5
  • Xu, Tianshu6
  • Yin, Jiyuan7
  • Shi, Hanfen8
  • Ye, Zimengwei9
  • Zhu, Ruyuan10
  • Gao, Junfeng11
  • Dong, Guangtong12
  • Zhao, Dandan13
  • Gao, Sihua14
  • Wang, Xinxiang15
  • Prentki, Marc16
  • Brὂmme, Dieter17
  • Wang, Lili18
  • Zhang, Dongwei19
  • 1 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 2 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 3 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 4 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 5 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 6 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 7 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 8 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 9 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 10 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 11 The Scientific Research Center, Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100078, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 12 Department of Chinese Medicine Formulas, School of Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 102488, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 13 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 14 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 15 The Scientific Research Center, Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100078, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 16 Departments of Nutrition and Biochemistry and Montreal Diabetes Research Center, CRCHUM and Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (Canada)
  • 17 Department of Oral Biological & Medical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (Canada)
  • 18 Department of TCM Pharmacology, Chinese Material Medica School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 102488, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
  • 19 Diabetes Research Center, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of ethnopharmacology
Publication Date
Jan 30, 2024
Volume
319
Issue
Pt 2
Pages
117167–117167
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2023.117167
PMID: 37716489
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

SiJunZi decoction (SJZD), one of the traditional Chinese medicine formulas, has been clinically and traditionally used to improve glucose and lipid metabolism and promote bone remodeling. To study the actions and mechanisms of SJZD on bone remodeling in a type 2 diabetes mouse model. Diabetic mice generated with a high-fat diet (HFD) and streptozotocin (STZ) were subjected to SJZD treatment for 8 weeks. Blood glucose and lipid profile, redox status and bone metabolism were determined by ELISA or biochemical assays. Bone quality was evaluated by micro-CT, three-point bending assay and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR). Bone histomorphometry alterations were evaluated by Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and Safranin O-fast green staining. The expressions of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), advanced glycation end products (AGEs), receptor for advanced glycosylation end products (RAGE), phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa-B (p-NF-κB), NF-κB, cathepsin K, semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), p-GSK-3β, (p)-β-catenin, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Cyclin D1 in the femurs and/or tibias were examined by Western blot or immunohistochemical staining. The main constituents in the SJZD aqueous extract were characterized by a HPLC/MS. SJZD intervention improved glucose and lipid metabolism and preserved bone quality in the diabetic mice, in particular glucose tolerance, lipid profile, bone microarchitecture, strength and material composition. SJZD administration to diabetic mice preserved redox homeostasis in serum and bone marrow, and prevented an increase in AGEs, RAGE, p-NF-κB/NF-κB, cathepsin K, p-GSK-3β, p-β-catenin expressions and a decrease in Sema3A, IGF1, β-catenin, Runx2 and Cyclin D1 expressions in tibias and/or femurs. Thirteen compounds were identified in SJZD aqueous extract, including astilbin, liquiritin apioside, ononin, ginsenoside Re, Rg1, Rb1, Rb2, Ro, Rb3, Rd, notoginsenoside R2, glycyrrhizic acid, and licoricesaponin B2. SJZD ameliorates bone quality in diabetic mice possibly via maintaining redox homeostasis. The mechanism governing these alterations are possibly related to effects on the AGEs/RAGE and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. SJZD may offer a novel source of drug candidates for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2023 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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