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The signal transducer NPH3 integrates the phototropin1 photosensor with PIN2-based polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis root phototropism.

Authors
  • Wan, Yinglang
  • Jasik, Jan
  • Wang, Li
  • Hao, Huaiqing
  • Volkmann, Dieter
  • Menzel, Diedrik
  • Mancuso, Stefano
  • Baluška, František
  • Lin, Jinxing
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Plant Cell
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologists
Publication Date
February 2012
Volume
24
Issue
2
Pages
551–565
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1105/tpc.111.094284
PMID: 22374399
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Under blue light (BL) illumination, Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow away from the light source, showing a negative phototropic response. However, the mechanism of root phototropism is still unclear. Using a noninvasive microelectrode system, we showed that the BL sensor phototropin1 (phot1), the signal transducer NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3), and the auxin efflux transporter PIN2 were essential for BL-induced auxin flux in the root apex transition zone. We also found that PIN2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to vacuole-like compartments (VLCs) in dark-grown root epidermal and cortical cells, and phot1/NPH3 mediated a BL-initiated pathway that caused PIN2 redistribution to the plasma membrane. When dark-grown roots were exposed to brefeldin A (BFA), PIN2-GFP remained in VLCs in darkness, and BL caused PIN2-GFP disappearance from VLCs and induced PIN2-GFP-FM4-64 colocalization within enlarged compartments. In the nph3 mutant, both dark and BL BFA treatments caused the disappearance of PIN2-GFP from VLCs. However, in the phot1 mutant, PIN2-GFP remained within VLCs under both dark and BL BFA treatments, suggesting that phot1 and NPH3 play different roles in PIN2 localization. In conclusion, BL-induced root phototropism is based on the phot1/NPH3 signaling pathway, which stimulates the shootward auxin flux by modifying the subcellular targeting of PIN2 in the root apex transition zone.

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