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Short- and long-term mortality following hypnotic use.

Authors
  • Hedström, Anna Karin1, 2
  • Hössjer, Ola3
  • Trolle Lagerros, Ylva4, 5
  • Åkerstedt, Torbjörn1, 6
  • 1 Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 3 Mathematical Statistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 4 Clinical Epidemiology Division, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 5 Center for Obesity, Academic Specialist Center, Stockholm Health Services, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 6 Stress Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Sleep Research
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2020
Volume
29
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jsr.13061
PMID: 32420667
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Potential long-term consequences of hypnotics remain controversial. We used the prospective Swedish National March Cohort, a study based on 41,695 participants with a mean follow-up duration of 18.9 years. Logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazards models with attained age as timescale were used to assess associations of hypnotic use with short- and long-term mortality. The proportion of subjects who initiated or discontinued hypnotic use during follow-up was substantial. All groups of hypnotics were associated with increased mortality within 2 years after a first prescription, with an overall OR of 2.38 (95% CI, 2.13-2.66). The association was more pronounced among subjects younger than 60 years (OR, 6.16; 95% CI, 3.98-9.52). There was no association between hypnotic use and long-term mortality. The association between hypnotic use and increased mortality was thus restricted to a relatively short period after treatment initiation, and may be explained in terms of confounding by indication. © 2020 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

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