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Short communication: Self-reported sleep-wake disturbances preceding onset of full-threshold mood and/or psychotic syndromes in community residing adolescents and young adults.

Authors
  • Scott, Jan1
  • Byrne, Enda2
  • Medland, Sarah3
  • Hickie, Ian4
  • 1 Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 2 Institute of Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Institute of Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; QIMR Berghofer Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of affective disorders
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
277
Pages
592–595
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2020.08.083
PMID: 32898820
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Insomnia may predict onset of mental disorders in adults. However, it is unclear whether the same directional relationship exists during the peak age range for the onset of major mental disorders and/or whether other types of sleep-wake disturbance, such as hypersomnia, show similar associations. Longitudinal follow-up of >1800 community residing twins and non-twin siblings (mean age ~26; 57% female). Adjusted relative risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (Adj RR and 95% CI) were estimated for onset of depression, hypomania and psychosis in individuals with prior self-reported exposure to Insomnia and/or Hypersomnia or proxies for insomnia disorder (Insomnia and Daytime Impairment) and atypical symptom profile (Hypersomnia and Anergia). Risk of onset differed somewhat according to type of syndrome and the nature of sleep-wake disturbance (e.g. Insomnia alone increased risk of first onset of psychosis). Overall, the risk for onset of any syndrome was best identified using composite measures (Adj RR were ~1.5-2.5) such as Insomnia and Hypersomnia, Insomnia and Daytime Impairment, or Hypersomnia and Anergia, rather than singular items describing night-time disruption only. The magnitude of risk of onset of major mental health problems and the availability of effective, low-cost, individual and population-based interventions for sleep-wake disturbances, suggest that it is justifiable to introduce screening for and strategies to overcome sleep problems in youth. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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