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Short communication: Metagenomic evaluation of skin biopsies of udder sores in dairy cows.

Authors
  • Sorge, Ulrike S1
  • Binger, Elizabeth M2
  • Schefers, Jeremy2
  • Plummer, Paul J3
  • 1 Division for Udder Health and Milk Quality, Bavarian Animal Health Services, 85586 Poing, Germany; Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul 55108. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
  • 2 Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul 55108.
  • 3 Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames 50011; Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames 50011; National Institute of Antimicrobial Resistance Research and Education, Ames, IA 50011.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Dairy Science
Publisher
American Dairy Science Association
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2019
Volume
102
Issue
12
Pages
11470–11475
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3168/jds.2018-15863
PMID: 31629518
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The objectives of this study were (a) to evaluate skin biopsies of udder sores and negative control cows for the presence of mange and nonbacterial pathogens via histopathology and (b) to identify and compare bacterial abundance in the lesions of cows with udder sores and from the skin of healthy controls from the same farms. Cows from 3 dairy farms with (n = 23) and without (n = 12) udder sore lesions were enrolled, and punch biopsies (23 lesions, 23 negative control samples of cows with lesions, and 12 control samples of cows without lesions) were collected. The biopsies were evaluated histopathologically, and their 16S metagenome was analyzed. No signs of mange or viral or fungal infections were detected histopathologically in any samples. The α diversity of microbial populations decreased in lesions, across all farms, and the abundance of spirochaetes did not notably change, compared with controls. However, compared with control samples, the microbial fractions of Fusobacterium, Helcococcus spp., Anaerococcus spp., Porphyromonas spp., Prevotella spp., and Trueperella spp. increased several-fold in lesions. In summary, our results suggest that spirochaetes, viruses, and mange are unlikely to cause udder sores. Instead, sores were associated with a marked increase in the abundance of Fusobacterium, Helcococcus, Anaerococcus, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, and Trueperella. Future studies are needed to determine which of these bacteria initiates this polymicrobial infection. Copyright © 2019 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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