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Shared decision making for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with black transgender women.

Authors
  • McNulty, Moira C1, 2
  • Acree, M Ellen1
  • Kerman, Jared1, 2
  • Williams, H Herukhuti Sharif3, 4
  • Schneider, John A1, 2
  • 1 Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 2 Chicago Center for HIV Elimination, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 3 Sexuality Studies Concentration, Goddard College, Plainfield, VT, USA.
  • 4 Center for Culture, Sexuality, and Spirituality, New York, NY, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Culture, health & sexuality
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2022
Volume
24
Issue
8
Pages
1033–1046
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/13691058.2021.1909142
PMID: 33983866
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Shared decision making is a collaborative process intended to develop a treatment plan that considers both the patient's preferences and the health provider's medical recommendations. It is one approach to reducing healthcare disparities by improving patient-provider communication and subsequent health outcomes. This study examines shared decision making about HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with Black transgender women in Chicago, Illinois, USA, given high prevalence of HIV and disparities in PrEP use. Black transgender women were recruited online and in-person to participate in semi-structured interviews (n = 24) and focus groups (2; n = 14 total), conducted between 2016 and 2017. Iterative thematic content analysis took place. Analysis revealed that internalised transphobia and racism, combined with stigma from service providers, prevented disclosure of gender and sexual identity to providers. Stigma about PrEP as it relates to Black transgender women results in stereotype threat, which undermines patient-provider trust and deters shared decision making for PrEP. Shared decision making promotes cultural competence and humility and builds trust within the patient-provider relationship, leading to better communication and less stigma. The involvement of peers may be one way to mitigate stigma for Black transgender women around PrEP, promote cultural competence within organisations, and empower engagement in shared decision making for HIV prevention.

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