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Sexual dimorphism in minor physical anomalies in schizophrenic patients and normal controls.

Authors
  • Akabaliev, Valentin H
  • Sivkov, Stefan T
Type
Published Article
Journal
Comprehensive Psychiatry
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2003
Volume
44
Issue
4
Pages
341–348
Identifiers
PMID: 12923713
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to investigate the gender effecton minor physical anomalies (MPA) in schizophrenic patients and normal controls. Seventy-six schizophrenic patients (43 males and 33 females) and 82 normal control subjects (42 males and 40 females) were examined for MPA using a modified version of the Waldrop Physical Anomaly Scale. Men tended to be more stigmatized with MPA than women both in normal subjects and in schizophrenics (with this difference slightly expanding in schizophrenics). In both genders schizophrenic patients were significantly more likely to have MPA than normal controls, but the difference tended to be more pronounced in males. There was a tendency towards sex-related predilection for the increase of MPA in schizophrenics in terms of individual anomalies and topographic regions affected. Among schizophrenics, genders showed a somewhat opposite topography of MPA stigmatization, with relatively more pronounced peripheral dysmorphy in males and craniofacial dysmorphy in females. These data suggest greater vulnerability of the male fetus to endogenous or exogenous factors and different susceptibilities to developmental adversities in male and female schizophrenics. This finding is in accord with the increasing evidence that sex differences in the epidemiology of schizophrenia may be broader and more fundamental than previously thought.

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