Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Sex-specific computational models for blood pressure regulation in the rat.

Authors
  • Ahmed, Sameed1
  • Layton, Anita T1, 2
  • 1 Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Department of Biology and Schools of Computer Science and Pharmacology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
AJP Renal Physiology
Publisher
American Physiological Society
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2020
Volume
318
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1152/ajprenal.00376.2019
PMID: 32036698
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In the past decades, substantial effort has been devoted to the development of computational models of the cardiovascular system. Some of these models simulate blood pressure regulation in humans and include components of the circulatory, renal, and neurohormonal systems. Although such human models are intended to have clinical value in that they can be used to assess the effects and reveal mechanisms of hypertensive therapeutic treatments, rodent models would be more useful in assisting the interpretation of animal experiments. Also, despite well-known sexual dimorphism in blood pressure regulation, almost all published models are gender neutral. Given these observations, the goal of this project is to develop the first computational models of blood pressure regulation for male and female rats. The resulting sex-specific models represent the interplay among cardiovascular function, renal hemodynamics, and kidney function in the rat; they also include the actions of the renal sympathetic nerve activity and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system as well as physiological sex differences. We explore mechanisms responsible for blood pressure and renal autoregulation and notable sexual dimorphism. Model simulations suggest that fluid and sodium handling in the kidney of female rats, which differs significantly from males, may contribute to their observed lower salt sensitivity as compared with males. Additionally, model simulations highlight sodium handling in the kidney and renal sympathetic nerve activity sensitivity as key players in the increased resistance of females to angiotensin II-induced hypertension as compared with males.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times