Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Sex Differences in Comorbidity and Frailty in Europe.

Authors
  • Ahrenfeldt, Linda Juel1
  • Möller, Sören2, 3
  • Thinggaard, Mikael4, 5
  • Christensen, Kaare4, 5, 6, 7
  • Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune4
  • 1 Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, J. B. Winsløws Vej 9B, 5000, Odense C, Denmark. [email protected] , (Denmark)
  • 2 OPEN - Odense Patient Data Explorative Network, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. , (Denmark)
  • 3 Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. , (Denmark)
  • 4 Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, J. B. Winsløws Vej 9B, 5000, Odense C, Denmark. , (Denmark)
  • 5 Danish Aging Research Center, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. , (Denmark)
  • 6 Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. , (Denmark)
  • 7 Department of Clinical Genetics, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. , (Denmark)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International journal of public health
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2019
Volume
64
Issue
7
Pages
1025–1036
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00038-019-01270-9
PMID: 31236603
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To examine sex differences in prevalent comorbidity and frailty across age and European regions. This is a cross-sectional study based on 113,299 Europeans aged 50+ participating in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe from 2004-2005 to 2015. Sex differences in the Comorbidity Index and the Frailty Phenotype were investigated using ordinal logistic regressions. European women had generally higher odds of prevalent comorbidity (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.07-1.15) and frailty (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.51-1.62). Sex differences increased with advancing age. No overall sex difference in comorbidity was found in Western Europe, but women had more comorbidity than men in Eastern (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.18-1.44), Southern (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.15-1.30), and Northern (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.16) Europe. Women were frailer than men in all regions, with the largest sex difference in Southern Europe (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.72-1.96). European women are frailer and have slightly more comorbidity than European men lending support for the male-female health survival paradox.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times